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. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
and saying that a ceasefire will be announced in cairo this evening. israeli radio reporting that the ceasefire could be declared during secretary clinton's visit to jerusalem. she left from southeast asia where she has been traveling with the president. her diplomatic mission is the most direct engagement yet in these negotiations. >> her visits will build on the engagement that we've undertaken over the last several days including the engagement by president obama and secretary clinton with leaders in the region and to support a de-escalation of the violence. >> president obama himself was on the phone in the early hours of the morning trying to prevent the conflict from escalating into a ground war. explosions and smoke clouds dotted the skyline in gaza again as soon as the sun was up. more than 100 people are now confirmed dead there with dozens of children among those killed. more rockets from gaza landing in southern israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists
himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the words. not overly critical. we raised concerns. that in part answers the questions. >> they reach out fo
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
to his world view, whether it's in the middle east, the cairo speech, about china, russia, things like that. this was another one, i think, in that line of speeches, people really want ed to understand th obama doctrine if they read all of these speeches together almost in a little book form they would get a better understanding of the president's world view. i would assume a lot of people already believe they have that understanding. he's off to cambodia and then it's back home because he has to pardon that turkey. i'll see you soon. >> thanks, chuck. even across the world in asia, the president can't escape washington. at a buddhist monastery he joked that geshgs 0s on the fiscal cliff may require a little help in the almighty. >> yes, we're working on this budget. we're going to need a lot of prayer. >> also on the president's plate a developing fight over who removed language and talking points given to susan rights that suggested al qaeda may have been behind the terrorist attack in libya? >> it went to the so-called deputy's committee that's populated by appointees from the admin
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
to address the nation. before that atresz, more violence today in the streets of cairo. protesters demanding president morsi rescind his decree once again clashing with police. there are calms for giant protests coming up for tomorrow as well as saturday. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel joins us live from cairo with more on this. president morsi, richard, is expected to address the nation at the top of the hour. do we have any information about what he's going to say basically trying to calm the crowds that are expected to protest? >> reporter: yeah. i think what he's going to say, however, is not going to calm these crowds. it is only going to make them more angry. he's probably going to set a date for a referendum on the constitution. as you said, a week ago today, president morsi gave himself extraordinary powers. he made himself more powerful than any previous egyptian presidents. more powerful than the kings of egypt, in fact. he said that his word was law. that in decree that he issued could not be overturned by the supreme court, by any court in this land. his word
-- that anti-islamic video that sparked the riots in cairo. that's the confusion, that film or a terrorist attack? they got 20 intelligence reports blaming the film riot in cairo. but, this is critical, those reports were disproved over time. but disproved after petraeus made his initial presentation to congress. so david petraeus believes there's a lot of confusion and a lot of misrepresentation of what he originally told congress when he briefed them initially after the attacks. he wants to go up there tomorrow, sort it all out. he will also say he had his own talking points separate from u.n. ambassador susan rice. that came from somewhere other in the administration than his direct talking point. so he wants to get all this sorted out. he believes it was the al qaeda sympathizer group ansar al sharia that was responsible for the attacks. >> so the question, barbara, is he is convinced that the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi had nothing, nothing to do with that anti-muslim video that'd been posted on youtube, that this was a terrorist attack by this al qaeda affiliated organiz
the mobilization of 75,000 army reservists. joining us now is nbc live from gaza. as peace talks continue in cairo, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a fi
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
with egyptian negotiators in cairo. hamas is saying that israel can stop the fighting simply by agreeing to hamas' demands. they're claiming israel is begging for a truce. a claim that israel vehemently denies. in other lighter news this morning, let's turn back to u.s. political news where representative alan west is still buried in denial. he won his bid for a recount of early ballots in st. lucie county but he is still losing when it comes to keeping his congressional seat in florida's district 18. in fact, democratic patrick murphy picked up some 300 more votes over the weekend bringing his total to about 2,000. west is still refusing to concede the election saying that he plans to review the result and additional data in order to decide how to move forward. murphy has claimed victory and it is very clear that west is probably all done. we're back with more steph after the break. these talking points, that the right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? yo
fire in this critical part of the world? she's going to cairo, to egypt because everybody is counting on them. they are indispensable. the president is finishing his trip in the far east and he's kept up his schedule of public events and appearances there but he's been doing some diplomacy personally. "the new york times" reporting that the president spent last night up until 2:30 in the morning making one-on-one direct phone calls with the israeli prime minister and also not the head of hamas, not the palestinian authority, but the president of egypt, which for a generation was our ally in the region, even though it was a creepy and repressive dictatorship. now that country, that crucial nation in this critical part of the world has a whole new face and maybe a whole new character in terms of its international responsibilities. nobody knows if this effort by them to broker a ceasefire is going to work. but it seems almost as important for the region, for the world, for us, frankly, that if a cease fire is going to come from anywhere, it looks like it's going to come from there. joini
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
and they are not good for americans. the u.s. embassy in cairo has been closed. protesters are blocking the entrance, and the clashes are happening very, very close by. there is no indication at this time, however, that our embassy there is threatened. stay tuned. we'll keep you posted to the developments in that country. >>> and also in the middle east, we are seeing a rare moment of cooperation today between the palestinian authority and hamas. it's coming thousands of miles away from where they usually live. they're in new york, and both sides want their united nations status elevated. what does that mean? does it really do anything for them? basically, it's part of the palestinian effort, going on for decades now, to be an official country. equal in status with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.
him to account for what he does domestically and regionally. >> in cairo today delegations from israel and hamas are there for indirect talks to work on details beyond the initial cease-fire. i have a list of topics they're expected to cover, opening border crossings, easing israel's economic blockade and what do you expect from these discussions today? what are the chances any progress will be made? >> i think these already tough discussions. all the leverage that comes with having the military action on going is gone now. the pressure to make tough concessions and compromises is diminished and morsi is very distracted biz his own domestic crisis. i think you can have these talks go on for some time without major changes and that sets up the prospect for more conflict in the future. >> during this time if it takes awhile will the cease-fire hold? >> i think right now neither side has interest and i think more israel if iran starts to rearm hamas very quickly and i think they will see that as an untenable situation and it is possible you could over the next weeks see a resumption in so
a functioning, working relationship. and now hillary clinton's most important stop on this trip will be in cairo for talk with his president morsi. >> this is will cain. dynamic between hamas and iran, we had an official on that said these missiles have three words on them "made in iran." we also have heard that hamas and iran have had a tense relationship since hamas supported the uprising in syria. what's that relationship and what's iran's role right now? >> absolutely. there are sectarian issues here. iran is predominantly shiite and hamas is predominantly sunni. the leader of hamas moved headquarters out of damascus and sided with the opposition. there is that real tension. in many ways, gaza reflects the kind of rivalry playing out in syria and elsewhere in the region. hamas relies on iran for military training and its most important weaponry, but there is this tension over syria. it's in syria's interest right now to see all the world's attention focused on gaza rather than on damascus to take some of the pressure off. these relationships in the region are shifting. part of what we're see
the compound in central cairo. the protesters, they are actually not targeting the embassy. they have been demonstrating, however, for a week. there has been some fighting with riot police around tahrir square. they've got rocks, tear gas being hurled in the streets. demonstrators, they are trying to force president mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft of egypt's all-important new constitution. this is going to be the backbone, the centerpiece of egypt's dem
and protesters scuffled near cairo's tahrir square with arrests of young people many still upset by president mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, well here is your chance. a los angeles chapter of the society for the prevention of cruel tito animals is aucti
it is the cairo speech that you delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter. and today i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement for the people of the middle east. just imagine a president saying that. praise be to you and the name of god the passionate, the merciful. may god be upon you. this is a great day for you because behold a week, the american warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa and prisoner agreed jihad of american freedom once again but we don't remember that because words matter so much less than actions. if those are three broad lessons were the three most urgent issues on your agenda here won't repeat the words of my colleag
but celebrating it. while secretary of state clinton is in cairo trying to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas with the help of egypt she is closely monitoring reports from tel aviv and in constant contact with prime minister benjamin netanyahu's team. we have word this morning of a deadly attack in benghazi, libya. the chief of police has been assassinated overnight. three unidentified gunmen have targeted colonel outside of his home in a drive-by shooting. he was transported to a medical facility and reportedly died en route. he was appointed the head of security after the september 11th attack on our consulate there. bbc reports more than a dozen security officers have been killed in the eastern libyan city so far this year. we'll have more stephanie after the break. you're always welcome to join us in chat online. go to we'll see you after the break. now? you know the kind of guys who do like reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all of the time now. >> she g
, rick stengel of "time" magazine is standing by just back from cairo where they had an exclusive sit-down with mohamed morsi, the new president of egypt. e mirror, they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the end of this, our fifth year, our total can reach almost 25 million dollars. it's a nice reflection on us all. now through january 2nd. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by making it without 100% real cheddar cheese. but wouldn't be stouffer's mac & cheese. just one of over 70 s
.s. ambassador has now extended to several dozen people. many of them with ties into egypt and cairo. what more do you know about that, sir? >> we do know that there are dozens of suspects. this threes right in the -- flies in the face of the administration told us that this was some mob and a video that got out of control. what is clear from the beginning it was terrorist attack that was coordinated. there were terrorist at it being activities in benghazi in months leading up to this. thanks to senator lindsey graham we're able to interview somebody there in tunisia. bill: you were just in tripoli. you did not come back with a favorable review. you have alleged that the administration is stonewalling. is that still the case now or has there been a little give-and-take on some information and questions you have? >> hopefully now we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did not. i sent the first letter over to secretary clinton on september 20th. they had the gal to print out pages on internet site and pretend they were somehow complying
. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. >> reporter: this attempt by the government to push through a draft constitution in one day's time was an effort to stem the process it appears to have backfired. we are seeing greater numbers of opposition protestors out on the street today, they seem to be energized by this move by the government. already sharp criticism of this new draft constitution, criticism that it fails to protect the rights of women, also concerns about the role of islamic law in this new constitution. the next step is for a referendum. president morsi has 30 days to put it to a vote across the nation. he has said when the constitution is ratified he will give up the extraordinarys he assumed last week. it was that move by the president that really kicked off these processes. we have large crowds now of anti-more se anti-moris demonstrators and tphopl we will probably see large crowds of pro-mori demonstrators. back to you. jenna: steve harrigan with the sounds of the street behind him. steve thank you. jon: a ten-year-old girl vanished from her neighborhood in florid
there are cease-fire negotiations going on inside cairo and today the prime minister says the israeli army is ready for the escalation, the only thing that would mean a ground war and came at 24 hours notice to put a cease-fire deal on the table or tanks will be headed across these fields. >> dave: say staff, my friend. it's complicated by the fact that turkey, tunisia, u.s. allies, democratic governments appear early side hamas. >> ainsley: can't take living here in america for granted. can you imagine that, hearing the sirens and hunker down and find a rock. >> clayton: all tw take would be one rocket. and let's check the weather and rick reichmuth is looking at the forecast, headed into the big travel week. >> rick: everybody wants to know whether they can get home. what the weather looks like, look at the sunny icons there, that's good. temps not bad. plenty of sunshine, no big storms or wind that's going to impede air travel. across the west, a bit of a different story, and across area of the northwest and northern california where we'll see some rain and some showers, it's not going
down with egypt's president in cairo. we'll be following that as well. >>> all right. coming up on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog adviso
and i have asked my special coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain our priority. a two-state solution ending the occupation, and ending the conflict between israel and the palestinians is more urgent than ever. achieving this vision, which has been expressed by this council, has been long overdue and necessary for the stability of the region. comprehensive peace can lead -- can bring lasting security. i am leaving shortly. i wish you a happy thanksgiving. thank you, mr. president >> i thank the secretary general for his briefing. there are no more names inscribed on the list of speakers. , the security council has just concluded the present state of the item on its agenda. the meeting is adjourned. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the security council wraps up its meeting from u.n.
coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain our priority. a two-state solution ending the occupation, and ending the conflict between israel and the palestinians is more urgent than ever. achieving this vision, which has been expressed by this council, has been long overdue and necessary for the stability of the region. comprehensive peace can lead -- can bring lasting security. i am leaving shortly. i wish you a happy thanksgiving. thank you, mr. president. >> i thank the secretary general for his briefing. there are no more names inscribed on the list of speakers. david plouffe and steve schmidt discuss the 2012 eletion next. later, the chairman of cbs news, jeff fager on the future of journalism and cbs news. tomorrow, university of maryland professor shibley telhami on israel and hamas cease-fire. then, poverty in the united states. jacqueline pata explains with the sequest
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)